A Voyage into the Past: Magellan's Discovery

  • Port

    Punta Arenas, Chile

  • Activity Level

    Moderate

  • Excursion Type

    All

  • Wheelchair Accessible

    NO

  • Cost

    USD USD

    Price between $51-$100
  • Minimum Age

    Information not currently available.

  • Duration

    Approximately 3 Hours

  • Meals Included

    No

Only 18 members survived Magellan’s 1519 expedition, which circumnavigated the globe and put Tierra del Fuego on the map. The territory you’ll cover today played a significant role in Magellan’s epic voyage, and your outing will introduce you to the saga and the first inhabitants of Fireland (Tierra del Fuego).

Your guide will first show you some points of interest in Punta Arenas, the southernmost city in the world, but the major highlights are found in the rugged, scenic beauty outside of the city.

You will head to Nao Victoria Museum, which contains a life-size replica of Ferdinand Magellan’s ship -- the vessel in which he circumnavigated the globe. The ship replica recreates all the original structural features and, unlike many museums, offers a very tactile experience, as visitors are encouraged to hear the sounds of yesteryear and touch the replica everyday objects, including navigation instruments and artillery.

The Maggiorino Borgatello Museum was founded by Salesian missionaries. This facility provides a comprehensive overview of the regional flora and fauna, the habitat of the local indigenous people, and regional history.

From here, you will drive to the Cerro la Cruz Viewpoint and take in the same view of the Strait of Magellan that Ferdinand Magellan himself had when he was here. You’ll also see the port and Tierra del Fuego Island -- the legendary Fireland.

On the way back to the ship, stop at Plaza de Armas (the main square), where an imposing statue of Ferdinand Magellan looks towards the strait that bears his name.

Notes:

You must climb a long flight of stairs to reach some of the displays at the Maggiorino Borgatello Museum and most of the exhibit interpretive panels are written in Spanish only.