GRAND VOYAGES

A cruise can provide a welcome relief from the routines of daily life—an opportunity for a taste of culture and history in ports, fine dining and entertainment at sea and some warm days under the sun. Holland America Line’s Grand Voyages, however, offer a different form of seafaring. These longer cruises let travelers truly immerse themselves in both days at sea and ports of call, whether it’s on the Grand Voyage, a 111-day circumnavigation of the globe, or a shorter regional itinerary. Whichever you choose, the journey is enriched by knowledgeable speakers and shore excursion leaders—not to mention fellow travelers as eager as you to see the world.

Featured Ports

In Partnership With

Cape Town, South Africa

Cape Town's spectacular setting on Table Bay seldom fails to take one's breath away, whether you are a local or a visitor. If Johannesburg is South Africa's New York, this port city of four million, settled by traders from the Dutch East India Company in 1652, is its San Francisco. With a rich array of restaurants, galleries, vineyards and countless beaches, as well as a Mediterranean climate, life on the Cape Peninsula, which stretches for some 70 kilometers (43 miles) from downtown to the most southerly point, Cape Point, is genteel and all about good, healthy living and staying outdoors as much as possible.

In Partnership With

Tauranga (Rotorua), New Zealand

The curved shoreline of the Bay of Plenty—known in Maori as Te Moana-a-Toi—is home to incredible surfing, white-sand beaches and New Zealand's only active marine volcano. Tauranga, with 130,000 residents, is the largest city on the Bay of Plenty and fifth largest in New Zealand. The city offers visitors a number of water-focused activities, like sailing and kayaking, as well as drier alternatives such as shopping and people-watching at a café in the Historic Village. Tauranga is also a great jumping-off point for exploring nearby beaches and Te Puke, the kiwifruit capital of the world, as well as a wealth of Maori cultural sites.

In Partnership With

Hong Kong, China

Among the world's most glamorous and cosmopolitan cities, Hong Kong sits on the southern coast of China at the Pearl River estuary of the South China Sea. It comprises Hong Kong Island, where the Central Business District and most affluent areas and attractions are, and, on the mainland, Kowloon and the New Territories. Hong Kong is a regional and global hub for banking, shipping, fashion and food, boasting more than 60 Michelin-starred restaurants. Its five-star hotels are among the most elegant to be found anywhere; many are set in the towering skyscrapers that carpet Hong Kong Island's steep slopes and light up its skyline so beautifully.

In Partnership With

Sydney, Australia

If you want a snapshot of Australia's appeal, look no further than Sydney: The idyllic lifestyle, friendly locals and drop-dead natural beauty of this approachable metropolis and its attractions explain why the country tops so many travelers' wish lists. The famed harbor is among the top sights—home to twin icons the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge, it is the stepping-off point for some of the city's best cultural attractions and sightseeing. But Sydney is more than just the embodiment of classic antipodean cool—the city is in a constant state of evolution.

In Partnership With

Phuket, Thailand

Thailand's largest island sits just off the country’s west coast, in the glittering Andaman Sea. Phuket offers both cultural attractions and natural beauty. The influence of European and Chinese traders is best seen in the architecture of Old Phuket Town, where former mansions have become hotels, restaurants, cafés and shops. Outside the island’s main city, travelers will find a tropical paradise, with gorgeous white-sand beaches and warm, crystal-clear waters where visitors come to swim, snorkel and scuba dive. One of the prettiest places to take a dip is Phang Nga Bay while the Big Buddha and Chalong Highlands are popular sights.

In Partnership With

Singapore

City-states are rare in the present day—and none are quite like Singapore. In the 20th century, the Southeast Asian nation hurtled itself into the modern world, and it continues to expand its state-of-the-art transportation system and build its edgy skyline. Yet Singapore's urban plan wisely maintained its intimate neighborhoods, many with streets lined with colorful shophouses (a type of building unique to parts of Asia, with businesses located on their ground floors and residences above). Add the city’s mix of ethnic groups—mainly Malays, Chinese and Indians—and you get a vibrant cultural scene that attracts a cosmopolitan, international community.