Chile Cruises

Chile is long, lean, and loaded with astonishing wonders, which Holland America Line reveals during your South America voyage. Raft the Petrohue River in Puerto Montt, visit the UNESCO-designated churches of Chiloe from Castro, and make celestial discoveries at the Cerro Tololo Observatory near Coquimbo. Holland America Line opens cellar doors at wineries in the Rosario and Casablanca valleys near San Antonio, while Puerto Arenas serves as gateway to cool adventures in Patagonia and Antarctica.

Featured Ports

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Cape Horn and Drake Passage

Cape Horn marks the entrance to the Drake Passage, where the Atlantic and Pacific oceans meet. Until the Panama Canal opened in 1914, this was one of the planet’s major shipping routes. Strong winds, currents, waves and icebergs made the passage fairly treacherous in the days of sailing ships. Even today, “rounding the Horn” remains a challenge for the many yacht races that pass through its icy waters. Hornos, the island where Cape Horn is located, may look desolate and treeless, but it’s home to a vast number of gulls and other seabirds.

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Scenic cruising Darwin Channel

Chile famously stretches for some 4,300 kilometers (2,700 miles) along the Pacific Ocean, a long, narrow country. Over its bottom half, countless channels, fjords, islands and massive glaciers, all formed by tectonic pressure, resemble scattered puzzle pieces. Those glaciers, which once covered every inch below, roughly, the 42nd parallel south, now account for less than 3 percent of the nation’s surface. But what a 3 percent. To reach these glaciers, skilled pilots lead ships of intrepid travelers through the labyrinthine waterways that can be found from Chiloé Island to rugged Cape Horn in Tierra del Fuego at the bottom of the Earth.
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Punta Arenas, Chile

If Punta Arenas exudes an "edge of the world" air, it's not without reason. This windblown city near Chile's southernmost tip sits on the Strait of Magellan, which itself is positioned squarely between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The city has played—and continues to play—an important role in geographic, political and economic affairs in South America's so-called Southern Cone, which is formed by Chile and neighboring Argentina. From penguin spotting on Isla Magdalena and kayaking the Strait of Magellan to visiting area farms and then indulging in surf-and-turf specialties (here meaning fresh seafood and asado, or Chilean barbecue) at local restaurants, Punta Arenas is worth a stopover.

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San Antonio (Santiago), Chile

This large, modern port serves Chile’s capital, Santiago, a city with Spanish colonial charm and a vivacious spirit. Encircled by the Andes and the Coastal Range, Santiago is centered around the Plaza de Armas, with several of the city’s landmarks: the 18th-century Metropolitan Cathedral the Palacio de la Real Audencia from 1808, the City Hall and the National Museum of History. North of San Antonio lie the picturesque old port and university town of Valparaíso and the colorful seaside resort of Viña del Mar. In between the coast and the capital are valleys filled with some of Chile’s most famous wineries, all inviting you to come and taste.  
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San Antonio (Santiago), Chile

This large, modern port serves Chile’s capital, Santiago, a city with Spanish colonial charm and a vivacious spirit. Encircled by the Andes and the Coastal Range, Santiago is centered around the Plaza de Armas, with several of the city’s landmarks: the 18th-century Metropolitan Cathedral the Palacio de la Real Audencia from 1808, the City Hall and the National Museum of History. North of San Antonio lie the picturesque old port and university town of Valparaíso and the colorful seaside resort of Viña del Mar. In between the coast and the capital are valleys filled with some of Chile’s most famous wineries, all inviting you to come and taste.  
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Ushuaia, Argentina

Dramatic, fantastical, otherworldly—this is the end of the world, for real. Positioned at the southernmost tip of Argentina, this memorable port town is cradled between the pristine—and towering—Martial Mountains and accessed by the picturesque Beagle Channel (which was named for Darwin’s famed vessel). Ushuaia, a maze of streets lined with low-slung buildings, is the capital of the Tierra del Fuego region, which is best described as a spectacular collection of superlative natural wonders. It’s a veritable kaleidoscope of glittering glaciers, snowcapped mountains, dense forests, sparkling lakes and windswept plains spread across an archipelago of rugged islands.