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Cruise Diary: Port of San Diego

Guest Sharon Johnson and her husband are cruising again with HAL, this time on Zaandam’s 21-Day Collectors’ Voyage to Mexico and Hawaii. Sharon will chronicle their cruising experience for us on the blog. Enjoy!

Feb. 16, 2013:
Al and I had planned to visit the Maritime Museum which is within walking distance of the ship, but we changed our minds when we discovered that there would be Hawaiian music in the Lido pool area around noon today. Hawaiian Legend Henry Kaleialoha Allen played Hawaiian favorites. We enjoyed the dancing of Paki and Malia (Hawaiian dancers) who were wearing matching outfits. Henry played for several hours and then came back at 5 p.m. for the ship’s sail-away to play more Hawaiian favorites with the HALCats. – Sharon & Al Johnson

Hawaiian Legend Henry Kaleialoha Allen playing with the HALCats.

Hawaiian Legend Henry Kaleialoha Allen playing with the HALCats.

We met all the new members of the “On Location” team who will be cruising with us to Hawaii and around the islands. Al had his photo taken with Sherron Allen who will assist Henry with narration on the ukulele and present a program on Hawaiian surfers and life guards later in the cruise.

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Paki, dancer and hula instructor.

Paki, dancer and hula instructor.

On Location Team Member Melia dancing.

On Location team member Melia dancing.

Al with Sherron Allen, "On Location" team member.

Al with Sherron Allen, “On Location” team member.

After lunch we watched the ice-carving demonstration at the Lido Pool. Party Planner Shannon introduced Christian, a chef from the culinary department, who would be carving a block of ice and making a sculpture. While Christian was carving, Shannon gave us some facts about ice-carving. The water that made up the block of ice was boiled first to take out all the impurities. Then it is frozen. The block weighs about 300 pounds. It is taken out of the freezer about an hour before being carved. That starts the melting process and makes it easier for the carver to carve. The culinary chefs don’t practice on ice before making their carving as a block of ice costs about $80. They make a drawing and then carve it out of Styrofoam. Then they transform the drawing to the ice. Experienced carvers can visualize their finished product in their heads. There is enough ice in the block of ice to chill a 1,000 ice teas. Christian carved an eagle for us.

Christian carving ice.

Christian carving ice.

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Christian posing with his creation.

Christian posing with his creation.

1 Comment
  • Steve J. Garrod

    What an incredible enhancement for guests sailing to Hawaii to bring the feeling of the island on board!

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