Skip To Content
- Blog -
Topic Search

Buenos Aires: It Takes Two Days To Tango

Holland America’s Veendam rounds Cape Horn on a series of cruises between now and March 2010 with overnights on select sailings in Buenos Aires.

Though Buenos Aires is a large city, you can take in the major attractions in a couple of days. During my short stay, I dined extravagantly on world-renowned Argentine beef, took in a tango show, hopped on a city tour and walked the city streets. If you have more time, you can also get out to an estancia (ranch), but if you decide to spend all of your time in the city, you will likely have opportunities to visit estancias on shore excursions during your cruise.

x

Puerto Madero

I never spent more than 9 pesos (about $3) to get anywhere in the city. I rode in a taxi for 20 minutes and spent only 9 pesos getting from my hotel near the trendy Puerto Madero docks (where reclaimed and restored warehouses feature some of the city’s finest restaurants and shops) to colorful La Boca. One porteño — as the 3 million residents of this port city on the Rio de la Plata are known — told me he sold his car when he moved to Buenos Aires, because taxis were so inexpensive.

While I used taxis plenty, I also walked: to Plaza de Mayo, a square dominated by the Casa Rosada (Pink House) presidential palace. Nearby, I stepped into the cathedral where San Martín’s repatriated remains lie (Martín helped liberate Argentina from Spanish rule in 1812) and strolled down the grand Avenida de Mayo, opened in 1894 and designed after the avenues of Paris.

Don’t miss the Recoleta Church and Cemetery, where Buenos Aires’ most illustrious departed lay at rest in ornate mausoleums. Among the most visited is the tomb of Evita Perón, much loved by Argentines for championing the causes of the working class.

La Boca

I hopped a taxi to the neighborhood of San Telmo, where I sipped coffee at Plaza Dorrego Bar while watching young people hanging out and old men play dominoes on the small square. Sundays, the square becomes an outdoor antiques fair.

From La Boca, I took a taxi through the slums along the waterfront, past trendy Puerto Madero, along Avenida del Libertador and the Malvinas War Memorial (a symbol of Argentina’s claim to the Falkland islands and its loss of the islands to Britain during a 10-week war in 1982), which was tauntingly constructed opposite the Tower of the English. The tower offers a free elevator to the top for panoramic city views.

Delicioso Dining

I was told not to leave Argentina without trying carne asadas (grilled meats) at a local parrilla (steakhouse) and enjoying the sweets known as alfajores. I decided to eat my way through the city by sampling both.

Plaza Dorrego

Plaza Dorrego

For carne asadas, I stepped into Las Nazarenas, directly across from the Sheraton at 1132 Reconquista (www.lasnazarenas.com.ar).

I started with grilled Chorizo sausage, followed by grilled provolone cheese topped with oregano and olive oil drizzled over. For my entree, I ordered Bife de Lomo, a small filet mignon and a glass of Malbec (the famed Argentine wine) to wash it down.

The next afternoon while walking through the city, I stopped at Havanna for an alfajor, the popular Argentine sweet. I’ve heard alfajores described as a Moon Pie with dulce de leche (caramel) instead of marshmallow. That’s a good description, although alfajores are typically smaller in circumference and thicker.

Two To Tango
One evening I headed back to La Boca. My driver dropped me at La Bombonera, the stadium of one of the world’s toughest soccer clubs: Boca Juniors. I wasn’t here to catch a game, however. My destination was next door: La Boca Tango (www.bocatango.com.ar). Open for only six months when I arrived, the new complex features three venues that you move through during the evening.

First, there is an exhibit that presents what La Boca looked like during the early 1900s when Italian immigrants poured in to the city. I walked through recreated rooms where multiple families shared living quarters and one bathroom. Next, we sat down for dinner, similar to the one I had Las Nazarenas, then followed that by returning to the exhibits, where actors portrayed what life was like for the immigrants. The show was lively and illuminating.

Afterward, we went inside a belle époque replica of a Parisian theater for a 60-minute tango performance that was mesmerizing. Though it appeared a difficult dance, I talked to travelers who took tango lessons while in Buenos Aires. — Ralph Grizzle, The Avid Cruiser


0 Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*